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Tombs of Akhet-hotep and Ptah-hotep Tombs of Akhet-hotep and Ptah-hotep
Photo courtesy of The Egypt Archive
Ptahotep sits before a table to receive
offerings. He is dressed in an animal skin.


The double tomb lies to the north of Djoser's complex on the road from Djoser's complex and the rest house. A road diverts southward to the tomb location.

The tomb consists of a pillared hall, two burial chambers and other rooms and passages. It belongs to Akhet-hotep and Ptah-hotep, a father and son who were officials during the reign of the 5th dynasty Pharaoh Djedkare (also known as Isesi).

Though the tomb has reliefs that are of the best of the Old Kingdom, decorations were not completed in it. The corridor next to the entrance features agriculture scenes. To the right side along the corridor is the pillared hall. The next gateway to the left in this hall leads to the single chapel of Ptah-hotep which has the best exquisite paintings illustrating the very details of the daily life and contains excellent representations of animals.

Going back to the hall: the next room to the left side belongs to Akhet-hotep which has less imposing reliefs than that of his son. A passage way to the left leads back to the entrance.

       
Image 1 Image 2 Image 3

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