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Archaeology Watch
4000-year-old tomb of Egyptian official unearthed at Saqqara.
Saturday, January 5 (issue 1)
by Raymon Kondos

CAIRO (youregypt.com) - Archaeologists recently unearthed a stone tomb of an Old Kingdom official at Saqqara, about 30 kms (18 miles) to the southwest of Cairo.
The tomb belongs to Ny-Ankh-Nefertem who was identified in his tomb as the keeper of the king’s property, the supervisor of the Great House and he overseer of linen. The discovery was made public last week by a statement from the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Saqqara
Saqqara pyramid

The official served during the Old Kingdom’s successive kings Unas (r. 2356 – 2323BC) and Teti (r. 2323 – 2291BC)
The tomb is a rectangular-shape building with false doors, a chapel and a burial chamber decorated with scenes showing aspects of the deceased’s life with his family and at some scenes appearing with deities, Egyptian Culture Minister Farouk Hosni was quoted to say in the statement.

Meanwhile, the chief of Egyptian antiquities, Zahi Hawas, said the tomb was found under a dense layers of rubbles in which they found remains of mummies, wooden coffins, skeletons and potteries dating back to later periods, specifically the Late Egyptian Period, Ptolemaic and Greco-Roman periods.

The tomb’s relieves are in a good state of preservation. One of the most vivid scenes is one that shows Ny-Ankh-Nefertem walking with his son.

Polish archeologists who took part in the joint Polish-Egyptian excavation effort said restoration of the tomb has already begun.

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